_DSC9494_DSC7487_DSC6669_DSC9760_nofoot_DSC9140
responsiveslider_lol_02 The Language of Light DVD - More
MeetJoe_02 Meet Joe McNally - More
inthebag What’s in the Bag? - More

Archive for the ‘News’ Category

Welcome PhotoShelter!

Oct 21

In News, Thanks at 5:46am

Last year, about this time, I taught at a conference called Luminance, put together by PhotoShelter. It brought a hugely diverse group of talents and interests together under the same tent. One of those very talented people was Allen Murabayashi, the CEO of PhotoShelter, and orchestrator of the conference. His neighborhood in NY is lower Manhattan, and in 2001, he actually lived just by the Trade Towers. We got to talking, and he showed me a picture on his Iphone he had made on 9/11, with the crisp blue sky, and the fires arching upwards, bent on destroying the buildings. It was like a punch in the gut, as pictures from that day are, I’m sure, for many, even now.

A year later, both Allen and PhotoShelter have stepped up on behalf of the collection Giant Polaroids known as the Faces of Ground Zero, and are partnering with me in preserving the collection, and hosting my website. It is a welcome, welcome partnership.

I have managed, sometimes just barely, to keep this collection of huge images, consisting of portraits made of people whose lives intersected the events of that day, together, and safe, in museum quality storage, for 12 years. There are numerous large crates, some weighing in at about 2,000 pounds. Storing 24,000 pounds of anything carries a price tag, especially artwork that requires certain atmospheric parameters. What PhotoShelter has done has been to step up and help, and to individually sponsor two of the images into the permanent safekeeping and care of the 9/11 Memorial Museum.

I look forward to many years of collaboration, not only in the realm of portfolio displays, internet presence, and projects with this group of creative folks. If you go to my website, you’ll see new work, and an updated look to the pages.

My thanks go out to Allen, Andrew Fingerman, Chris Owyoung, and Drew Gurian for orchestrating this new website in such smooth fashion. And to the entire PhotoShelter organization for helping to preserve these pictures. They join with Adorama, who has been a friend of the collection for many years, in this ongoing dozen year effort. The museum will be a reality shortly, and with this boost, we might just make it.

This type of wonderful collaboration reminds me yet again that the photo community is indeed, a community. More tk….

Memories of a Cover Story

Oct 3

In Memories, News at 6:59am

Trademark cigarette drooping from his lip, Tom Clancy stands in the calm swirl of the Chesapeake Bay, a body of water which occasionally had a mention in his novels, in 1988. He was in the throes of the amazing success of The Hunt for Red October, followed on by Red Storm Rising, and many others. He had 17 of his novels hit No. 1 on the New York Times best-seller list. Read the rest of this entry »

Scenes from a Pre-Con

Sep 7

In News, Seminars & Workshops at 11:56am

First off, many thanks to the Kelby clan for inviting me to Vegas to teach at PhotoShop World. It was a hoot of a week. I’ve been doing my own “pre-con,” during the last couple of gatherings of the PhotoShop tribes, and they, too, have been fun, and hopefully, informative.

This one was special, in the sense we had several astonishing performers who regularly appear in Cirque du Soleil shows in LV as our subjects. These supremely gifted artists are a magnet for the camera and the imagination. We also had the amazing Drew Moore, a character actor out of LA, who offered his considerable presence and baleful “tough guy” stare to the proceedings.

In the above, I purposely chose a tough backdrop in bright sun, with a blaring Budget Rental truck in the parking lot. In bright sun, at f16, the truck is especially obnoxious, so I showed the class how to minimize that distraction via the technique of high speed sync flash, with one SB-910, a D4 and a fast 28, shot at 1/8000th at f1.4. With that combo, the truck recedes in importance.

Performers flipped, flew and leaped for us all day long. Much of the arranging was thanks to Adam Silversmith, a Vegas based shooter, who works with the Cirque folks a great deal. Kudos to Adam for lining up spectacular subjects!

We also had a huge assist from Jan Lederman, and Jason Friedman of MacGroup USA, who charged down to Vegas with new developments in flash photography to show the class. On a couple of sets, we used Bowens flash units, which have amazing electronics, and we had a steady light set going with Limelight, the Bowens line of constant light sources. Both sets were hugely popular, and the cast and crew had access to the latest innovations in different styles of lights.

The heavy lifting of building all the sets and the light fell to Cali, and Jon Cospito in our studio, ably supported by my friend and fellow photog, MD Welch, the magnificent madman of Reno. He threw a tank of gas in his truck and bombed down out of the desert (“on the roads it was a white line nightmare”) to help us out. The pix in this blog are courtesy of the aforementioned gentlemen.

Add to the mix the great location of Shine Alternative Fitness in LV, and we had an amazing day. Thanks to all the performers, participants and crew! More tk….

Nikon Ambassador Program Launches!

Aug 26

In News at 6:14am

Nikon had big news last week, launching at long last an official Ambassador program, which includes a small field of long time Nikon pros. Very humbled to be included with this group of stalwarts. I could go through the list and make some guesses, but suffice it to say, there’s most likely about 400 years or so of experience behind the camera sprinkled amongst us.

Which is not say the group is a bunch of  grizzled old salts. There are fresh, young, talented faces like Lucas Gilman, Andrew Hancock and Dixie Dixon mixed in with veterans such as Ron Magill, Bill Frakes, Cliff Mautner, Corey Rich, and Moose Peterson. In terms of skill set, you have the makings of a really good picture agency here, as the various members of this diverse crowd can pretty much cover the waterfront, photographically, from fashion to sports to news to wildlife to portraits and weddings.

 

Many thanks to Nikon for stepping forward in a good direction to partner a community of photogs who have shot their cameras through all sorts of subject matter–politics, war zones, Super Bowls, Fashion Weeks, Nat Geo ends-of-the-earth type locations, bridezillas–you name it. Further thanks go to my blood brother, Mike Corrado of Nikon, for whom shaping this program and pushing it to become reality was a long and steadfast labor. Good job all around.

More tk….

Moving into the Freelance World…

Aug 19

In Memories, News, Thanks, Travels at 4:45am

Drew is leaving the studio. (His account below.) As I always say, Drew grew up as a drummer in a rock and roll band, but abandoned that unstable lifestyle to embrace the security of freelance photography. And we here at the studio are certainly glad he did. He stayed with us for five years, and was a mainstay as a first assistant, constantly troubleshooting, solving problems, handling the mysteries of post-production and generally being a great road companion, and we certainly saw a lot of road together. (When he joined the studio, he was just another Delta frequent flyer. As he leaves, he is Delta Diamond, having logged easily a half million air miles during his tenure here.) He was a great team player, a talented shooter, and he fit right in with the twisted humor and irreverent conduct of the studio. (FYI, we have no human resources department here.) We will miss him. I will miss him, as beyond all the stuff listed above, he became my good and true friend. 

Today’s blog is about Joe. And me.

A real life bro-mance, dream job come true, happily ever-after, fly me to the moon kind of working relationship I’ve experienced over the past 5 years.

He’s one of the few people I know in the industry who’s stayed afloat for 35+ years, has maintained a huge level of respect within the industry and – through it all – has kept a good head on his shoulders. He’s truly one of the most decent human beings I know. Full of integrity, courage, wit and an ongoing quest for pasta and red wine, Joe has taught me much more than just ‘the ropes’.

(My first ever tear sheet, accompanying Joe’s Power Grid story in National Geographic)

We all know the life of a photographer isn’t a 9 to 5 gig, but working with Joe is one of the more all-encompassing workplace scenarios one could imagine. Joe and I have spent a lot of time together, and by that I mean an average of 70% of the year on the road, and sometimes a good deal more. That means not only working in the field, but traveling together, eating together and often seeing more of each other than our significant others and families.

(The Flash Bus crew)

Working with Joe has been a major turning point in my career.  Prior to joining Joe I was a young photographer/musician living in a relatively small town and earning a living shooting mostly weddings and events. I didn’t have a whole lot of clarity of where to go from there.  I started applying to graduate schools for photojournalism – and in the midst of all that – Joe’s former assistant (Brad Moore) was leaving and Joe offered me the position. My game plan was to work with Joe for two years. As time went on, more travel came upon us and I just couldn’t help but to sign on for more adventure and experience.  I got to climb the Burj Khalifa, the tallest building in the world; I had my own helicopter and pilot while on assignment for National Geographic; and was once lead by a heavily armed militia through traffic in Nigeria. That’s just a glimpse into the countless extraordinary, hilarious and sometimes dangerous tales I have from the past few years.

(Cali and I surrounded by drones, on-location for National Geographic. By the way, Cali’s a great guy, and an incredibly talented shooter. He’s done an amazing job transitioning into the first assistant position, and I can’t begin to say how excited I am to hear about his travels.)

But even at the highest points in my time with Joe, Lynn and the entire studio family, I couldn’t help but feel a bit of an inner struggle.  As amazing as things have been, all I’ve wanted is to be a full-time photographer, and I’ve felt the itch to go out on my own more recently, especially in the last year. The thing is, I’ve had the absolute best apprenticeship I could have ever hoped for: Joe has been an amazing mentor, Lynn has balanced me with business smarts, and I’ve been immersed into the culture of the best and brightest photo talent in the World. I’ve also had the opportunity to travel around the Globe and back again. The thing is, if I didn’t want/need to be my own photographer, I could work with Joe happily for a very, very long time.

(Rolling Stone tear sheet, from the March, 2013 issue)

But the time has come for me and I’m now officially off on my own: with more clarity than I had five years ago, lots of contacts in the industry, tons of technical know-how and hands-on experience from working with one of the best guys out there.  If there was ever to be a good time to make that move, it feels like this is it, and I’m incredibly excited to create a body of work that’s all my own. Even with all that, i’m just as scared as I am excited to embark on this journey into the world of freelance photography.  Yes, I’m absolutely going to figure it out, like all things I do. I am more passionate about photography than anything else. I know it’s going to take some time to gain traction and that my future may hold nights of Ramen noodles and Hot Pockets.  But I’m ok with it.

(John Butler of John Butler Trio)

I became interested in photography at a young age through a love of live music. Back then I just wanted to capture live moments from my favorite bands. Over time my work has improved and a true passion towards music, photography and their marriage remains to this day. Most recently I’ve been trying to evolve my work away from live music and into a fresh perspective.  I’m not changing the world and I’m not reinventing the wheel, but every now and again I feel like I’m onto something really good. It’s in those moments I feel as though I’ve moving a step closer towards crafting a unique aesthetic that’s my own.

(Tyler Glenn of The Neon Trees)

Choosing to work for Joe was the best career decision I had made up until that point, and I’m certain that i’ll be able to look back upon this transition in a few years, and say the same thing.

(My incredibly patient girlfriend, Jessica)

Joe, Lynn, Cali, Lynda, Annie: You’ve all been the best friends, colleagues and family one could ever ask for, and I’m grateful for the time and memories we’ve shared.

It’s been a blast to meet and get to know lots of you out on the road, and I invite you all to keep in touch.

You can find me at any of these places:

Website/Blog: http://www.drewgurian.com

Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/drewgurian

Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/drewgurian

Facebook: http://on.fb.me/15cM7xp

Google+: http://bit.ly/15cMrfz

Thanks again,

Drew